Patients seen by a Chiropractor have 55% less likelihood of filling an Opioid prescription!

NEW STUDY CONFIRMS: Patients seen by a Chiropractor have 55% less likelihood of filling an Opioid prescription!

The US is in a massive Opioid crisis. Opioid prescriptions for musculoskeletal conditions is only exceeded by opioid prescriptions for cancer patients. We know that not only the drugs don’t solve the underlying issue causing the pain, but they have harmful addictive effects.

Recently at the DC2017 conference, Dr. James Whedon presented his study of over 12,000 subjects which revealed that when patients saw DC’s, they had a significantly lower risk of getting an opioid prescribed.

There were also lower costs for these patients as well.

Watch the video below where I interview Dr. Whedon on his remarkable research and the next study he will be conducting.

This study was made possible by a grant made by the Clinical Compass, thanks to a generous donation made by the Michigan Chiropractic Foundation.

In order to get this next study funded, which could be upwards of OVER ONE MILLION SUBJECTS, we are asking that anyone and everyone in the profession donate to the Clinical Compass. This work will change the game for us to work more cooperatively with payers and policy makers.

Please do what you can to donate. Every little bit helps. Thank you!

Meyer DC Catalog Request

ABSTRACT
Association between utilization of chiropractic services for low back pain and use of prescription opioids

Objective
The overuse of prescription opioids for treatment of low back pain in the US is associated with addiction, adverse drug events, and escalating costs. Chiropractic, a non-pharmacological treatment for back pain, may lead to reduced use of opioids.  This study was intended to quantify the association between utilization of chiropractic services for low back pain and use of prescription opioids

Methods
We analyzed all-payer health claims data on New Hampshire residents aged 18-99 with low back pain.  We employed logistic regression to compare recipients of chiropractic services to non-recipients with regard to the likelihood of prescription fills for opioid medication. We quantified the associated charges.

Results
The rate of opioid use was lower for recipients of chiropractic services (19%) as compared to non-recipients (35%). The likelihood of filling a prescription for opioids was 55% lower in the chiropractic recipient cohort (OR 0.45; 95% CI 0.40, 0.47). Average annual per-person charges for opioid prescription fills were 78% lower for recipients of chiropractic services as compared to non-recipients.

Conclusion
Utilization of chiropractic care may lead to reduced use of opioid medications.

Recommended Products from DC Aligned